Bette Davis: Herstory 4

By BettyJean Downing

Ruth Elizabeth “Bette” Davis (April 5, 1908 – October 6, 1989) was an American actress of film, television and theatre.

  • Davis was the co-founder of the Hollywood Canteen,
  • First female president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
  • She won the Academy Award for Best Actress twice,
  • The first person to accrue 10 Academy Award nominations for acting,
  • The first woman to receive a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Film Institute.

Her career went through several periods of eclipse, and she admitted that her success had often been at the expense of her personal relationships.

Married four times, she was once widowed and thrice divorced, and raised her children as a single parent. Her final years were marred by a long period of ill health, but she continued acting until shortly before her death from breast cancer, with more than 100 films, television and theatre roles to her credit. In 1999, Davis was placed second, after Katharine Hepburn, on the American Film Institute’s list of the greatest female stars of all time.

“I went back to work because someone had to pay for the groceries.” ~ Bette Davis

Mini Biography
Ruth Elizabeth Davis was born April 5, 1908, in Lowell, Massachusetts. Her parents divorced when she was 10. She and her sister were raised by their mother, Ruthie. Bette demanded attention from birth, which led to her pursuing a career in acting. After graduation from Cushing Academy she was refused admittance to Eva Le Gallienne’s Manhattan Civic Repertory because she was considered insincere and frivolous. She enrolled in John Murray Anderson’s Dramatic School and was the star pupil. She was in the off-Broadway play “The Earth Between” (1923), and her Broadway debut in 1929 was in “Broken Dishes”. She also appeared in “Solid South”. Late in 1930, she was hired by Universal. When she arrived in Hollywood, the studio representative who went to meet her train left without her because he could find no one who looked like a movie star. An official at Universal complained she had “as much sex appeal as Slim Summerville” and her performance in The Bad Sister (1931) didn’t impress. In 1932 she signed a seven-year deal with Warner Brothers Pictures. She became a star after her appearance in The Man Who Played God (1932). Warners loaned her to RKO in 1934 for Of Human Bondage (1934), in which she was a smash. She had a significant number of write-in votes for the Best Actress Oscar, but didn’t win. She finally DID win for Dangerous (1935) and Jezebel (1938)). She constantly fought with Warners and tried to get out of her contract because she felt she wasn’t receiving the top roles an Oscar-winning actress deserved, and eventually sued the studio. Returning after losing her lawsuit, her roles improved dramatically. The only role she didn’t get that she wanted was Scarlett O’Hara in Gone with the Wind (1939). Warners wouldn’t loan her to David O. Selznick unless he hired Errol Flynn to play Rhett Butler, which both Selznick and Davis thought was a terrible choice. It was rumored she had numerous affairs, among them George Brent and William Wyler, and she was married four times, three of which ended in divorce. She admitted her career always came first. She made many successful films in the 1940s, but each picture was weaker than the last and by the time her Warner Brothers contract had ended in 1949, she had been reduced to appearing in such films as the unintentionally hilarious Beyond the Forest (1949). She made a huge comeback in 1950 when she replaced an ill Claudette Colbert in, and received an Oscar nomination for, All About Eve (1950). She worked in films through the 1950s, but her career eventually came to a standstill, and in 1961 she placed a now famous Job Wanted ad in the trade papers.

She received an Oscar nomination for her role as a demented former child star in What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962), which brought her a new degree of stardom in both movies and television through the 1960s and 1970s. In 1977 she received the AFI’s Lifetime Achievement Award and in 1979 she won a Best Actress Emmy for Strangers: The Story of a Mother and Daughter (1979) (TV). In 1977-78 she moved from Connecticut to Los Angeles and filmed a pilot for the series “Hotel” (1983), which she called Brothel. She refused to do the TV series and suffered a stroke during this time. Her daughter Barbara Merrill wrote a 1985 “Mommie Dearest”-type book, “My Mother’s Keeper”. She worked in the later 1980s in films and TV, even though a stroke had impaired her appearance and mobility. She wrote a book “This ‘N That” during her recovery from the stroke. Her last book was “Bette Davis, The Lonely Life”, issued in paperback in 1990. It included an update from 1962 to 1989. She wrote the last chapter in San Sebastian, Spain. When she passed away of cancer on October 6, 1989, in France, many of her fans refused to believe she was gone.

IMDb Mini Biography By: Meredy

Mini Biography
Her parents divorced when she was young. In her first year of high school, she gave up dance for acting. After a little time in John Murray Anderson’s acting school, she was in the off-Broadway play “The Earth Between” (1923). Her Broadway debut in 1929 was in “Broken Dishes”. Late in 1930, on a six-month Universal contract, she arrived in Hollywood. The studio representative who went to meet her train left without her because he could find no one who looked like a movie star. In 1932 she signed a seven-year deal with Warners. She won Oscars for Dangerous (1935) and Jezebel (1938) and fought unsuccessfully to break her contract between awards. She received eight additional Oscar nominations, including one for the role of Margo Channing in All About Eve (1950), the role with which she remains most identified. A genuine box-office star in the 1930s and 1940s, all her films from 1953 to 1962 lost money; then What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962) brought a new phase of stardom. In 1979 she won a Best Actress Emmy for Strangers: The Story of a Mother and Daughter (1979) (TV), and in 1982 she moved from Connecticut to Los Angeles to be in the 1982-3 TV series “Hotel” (1983) (illness led to her replacement by Anne Baxter–shades of All About Eve (1950)!). She had three children, one of whom was severely retarded. Her daughter B.D. Hyman (AKA Barbara Merrill) wrote a 1985 torrid biography, “My Mother’s Keeper”. In 1977 the American Film Institute gave her its Lifetime Achievement Award.

IMDb Mini Biography By: Ed Stephan

Mini Biography
Ruth Elizabeth Davis was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, on April 5, 1908. Her parents divorced when she was 10. Her early interests were in dance. To Bette, dancers led a glamorous life, but then she discovered the stage. She gave up dancing for acting. To her, it presented much more of a challenge. She studied drama in New York City and made her debut on Broadway in 1929. In 1930, she moved to Hollywood where she hoped things would get better for her in the world of acting. They did indeed. She would become known as the actress that could play a variety of very strong and complex roles. She was first under contract to Universal Studios, where she made her first film, called Way Back Home (1931). After the unsuccessful film The Bad Sister (1931), made the same year, she was fired, which was wildly unpopular. She then moved on to Warner Brothers. Her first film with them was Seed (1931). More fairly successful movies followed, but it was the role of Mildred Rogers in Of Human Bondage (1934) that would give Bette major acclaim from the film critics. Warner Bros. felt their seven-year deal with Bette was more than justified. They had a genuine star on their hands. With this success under her belt, she began pushing for stronger and more meaningful roles. In 1935, she received her first Oscar for her role in Dangerous (1935) as Joyce Heath. In 1936, she was suspended without pay for turning down a role that she deemed unworthy of her talent. She went to England, where she had planned to make movies, but was stopped by Warner Bros. because she was still under contract to them. They did not want her to work anywhere. Although she sued to get out of her contract, she lost. Still, they began to take her more seriously after that. In 1938, Bette received a second Academy Award nomination for her work in Jezebel (1938) opposite the soon-to-be-legendary Henry Fonda. Bette would receive six more nominations, including one for her role as Margo Channing in All About Eve (1950). While she was a genuine star in the ’30s and ’40s, the ’50s and early ’60s saw her in the midst of films that all lost money. Then came What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962) in which she played a deranged former child star and a rather spooky one at that. This brought about a new round of super-stardom for generations of fans who were not familiar with her work. Two years later she starred in Hush…Hush, Sweet Charlotte (1964). Bette was married four times. Her last marriage, to actor Gary Merrill, lasted ten years, longer than any of the previous three. In 1985, her daughter Barbara Davis (“B.D.”) Hyman published a scandalous book about Bette called “My Mother’s Keeper.” Sadly, Bette Davis died on October 6, 1989, of metastasized breast cancer.

Dorothy M. Jurney: Herstory 3

By: BettyJean Downing

From “drivel” to substance : transforming the women’s pages of the American newspaper ~Rodger Streitmatter

Dorothy Misener Jurney has been called the godmother of the transformation of the women’s pages in the nation’s newspapers. Jean Gaddy Wilson, a scholar of journalism, has said that Dorothy Jurney “single-handedly changed American newspapers” by changing the women’s pages. Dorothy was born in Michigan City, Indiana, in 1909 and her father, a newspaper man, had a deep influence on her career in journalism.

When Dorothy and I met for her oral history she had recently moved to a retirement community in Haverford, Pennsylvania. Just prior to my visit Dorothy had had a serious fall but, she managed to show me around the beautiful grounds of The Quadrangle and her warm and newly-decorated apartment. We settled into work in the library of the Manor House, a large, wood-panelled room with comfortable and attractive furnishings, a fireplace, and expansive views of the winter scenery.

Under her father’s tutelage Dorothy learned nearly every aspect of journalism, from subscriptions to layout to press type and machinery as well as what made a good story and how to edit it. Dorothy worked on her father’s paper, the Michigan City News, and then through her long career was an editor on the Gary Post-Tribune, the Miami News, the Washington News, the Miami Herald, the Detroit Free Press, and the Philadelphia Inquirer.

As women’s page editor Dorothy influenced an entire generation of women journalists by demonstrating that women’s pages could be more than a compilation of club notices, recipes, and bridal announcements. (See other oral histories in this series.) Dorothy worked to see that her reporters covered such cutting-edge, substantive news stories as pay discrimination against women, homosexuality in the schools, news in the black community, women workers in the auto industry, and women in politics. Her biographer, Sharon Nelton, has noted that the stories Dorothy published beginning in the 1950′s have become front page stories today.

Dorothy’s oral history also reveals that her career as a journalist was deeply undercut by discrimination. Hers is a classic tale of the strong forces which prohibited the advancement of talented women in journalism precisely because they were women. Catherine East has said that Dorothy was born too soon, and Jean Wilson told me that Dorothy would have been a major editor if she had been a man. When the men went to war Dorothy was promoted. But, when they came back, she had to leave. As a result she lost many of the opportunities she richly deserved and it took its toll on her own self esteem and sense of entitlement.

Dorothy was always interested in what made a good story from the standpoint of what people in the community needed to know. As women’s page editor, city editor, or managing editor Dorothy was convinced of the service newspapers owed their readership. Dorothy remains deeply interested in the grand sweep of American journalism, particularly the role of newspapers in educating the public and advancing democratic principles. Dorothy was a founder of New Directions for News, a center of innovative research in journalism at the University of Missouri School of Journalism. She was the first woman board member of the Associated Press Managing Editors organization. And, in 1988 Dorothy was awarded the University of Missouri Distinguished Service to Journalism Award.

Anne S. Kasper
1990

I ask that it be noted that this interview was conducted less than three weeks after I had sustained a concussion in a fall on the ice here at the Quadrangle on Dec. 31, 1989. I wanted to do the interview on the January dates, fearing I might be completely incapacitated later. I offer this explanation for the poor quality of my responses and beg the reader’s indulgence.

Dorothy M. Jurney
June 20, 1990

Elizabeth Blackwell: Herstory 2

Originally Posted on March 2, 2012 by freemenow

Elizabeth Blackwell (3 February 1821 – 31 May 1910) was the first female doctor in the United States.

She was the first openly identified woman to graduate from medical school, a pioneer in educating women in medicine in the United States, and was prominent in the emerging women’s rights movement.

Elizabeth Blackwell was born in Bristol, England and spent her early years living in a house on Wilson Street, off Portland Square, St Pauls, Bristol.

She was the third of nine children born to sugar refiner Samuel Blackwell and his wife, Hannah (née Lane).  Blackwell could afford to give his numerous sons an education and also believed that his daughters should get the same education as boys, so he had them tutored by the house servants.

While growing up, Blackwell lost six of her sisters and two of her brothers. One night when Blackwell was 11, a fire destroyed her father’s business. In 1832, the family emigrated to the United States and set up a refinery in New York City. The Blackwells were very religious Quakers. They believed that all men and women were equal in the eyes of God.

Due to their Quaker beliefs, the Blackwell family was anti-slavery. An opportunity was presented to Samuel Blackwell that allowed him to open a refinery in Ohio, where slaves would not be needed to harvest the sugar, so the Blackwells moved to Cincinnati. Three months after they moved, Elizabeth’s father got very sick with biliary fever and died.

After the death of her father, Blackwell took up a career in teaching in Kentucky to make money to pay for medical school. Blackwell found this work unpleasant. Desiring to apply herself to the practice of medicine, she took up residence in a physician’s household, using her time there to study from the family’s medical library. She became active in the anti-slavery movement (as did her brother Henry Brown Blackwell who married Lucy Stone, a suffragist). Another brother, Samuel Charles Blackwell, married another important figure in women’s rights, Antoinette Brown.

In 1845, she went to Asheville, North Carolina, where she read medicine in the home of Dr. John Dickson. Afterwards, she read with his brother Dr. Samuel Henry Dickson in Charleston, South Carolina.

She attended Geneva College in New York. She was accepted there — anecdotally, because the faculty put it to a student vote, and the students thought her application was a hoax — and braved the prejudice of some of the professors and students to complete her training. Blackwell is said to have replied that if the instructor was upset by the fact that Student No. 156 wore a bonnet, she would be pleased to remove her conspicuous headgear and take a seat at the rear of the classroom, but that she would not voluntarily absent herself from a lecture.

However, most of the faculty and students were not very polite to her. Blackwell’s male peers treated her very rudely. On 11 January 1849, she became the first woman to earn a medical degree in the United States, and graduated, on 23 January 1849, first in her class.

Banned from practice in most hospitals, she was advised to go to Paris, France and train at La Maternité, but had to continue her training as a student midwife, not a physician. While she was there, her training was cut short when in November, 1849 she caught a serious eye infection, purulent ophthalmia, from a baby she was treating. She had her eye removed and replaced with a glass eye.

In New York City, Elizabeth opened up her own practice. She was faced with adversity, but did manage to get some media support from entities such as the New York Tribune. She had very few patients, a fact Elizabeth attributed to the stigma of woman doctors as abortionists. In 1852, she began delivering lectures and published The Laws of Life with Special Reference to the Physical Education of Girls, her first work, a volume about the physical and mental development of girls. Although Elizabeth herself pursued a career and never married or carried a child, this treatise ironically concerned itself with the preparation of young women for motherhood.

In 1857, Blackwell along with her sister Emily and Dr. Marie Zakrzewska, founded their own infirmary, named the New York Infirmary for Indigent Women and Children. During the American Civil War, Blackwell trained many women to be nurses and sent them to the Union Army. Many women were interested and received training at this time. After the war, Blackwell had time, in 1868, to establish a Women’s Medical College at the Infirmary to train women, physicians, and doctors.

In 1857, Blackwell returned to England where she attended Bedford College for Women  for one year. In 1858, under a clause in the 1858 Medical Act that recognized doctors with foreign degrees practising in Britain before 1858, she was able to become the first woman to have her name entered on the General Medical Council’s medical register (1 January 1859).

In 1869, she left her sister Emily in charge of the college and returned to England. There, with Florence Nightingale, she opened the Women’s Medical College. Blackwell taught at London School of Medicine for Women, which she had co-founded, and accepted a chair in gynecology. She retired a year later.

During her retirement, Blackwell still maintained her interest in the women’s rights movement by writing lectures on the importance of education. Blackwell is credited with opening the first training school for nurses in the United States in 1873. She also published books about diseases and proper hygiene.

She was an early outspoken opponent of circumcision and in 1894 said that “Parents, should be warned that this ugly mutilation of their children involves serious danger, both to their physical and moral health.” She was a proponent of women’s rights and pro-life.

Her female education guide was published in Spain, as was her autobiography.

In 1856, she adopted Katherine “Kitty” Barry, an orphan of Irish origin, who was her companion for the rest of her life.

In 1907 Blackwell was injured in a fall from which she never fully recovered. She died on 31 May 1910 at her home in Hastings in Sussex after a stroke. She was buried in June 1910 in Saint Mun’s churchyard at Kilmun on Holy Loch in the west of Scotland

Emily Warren Roebling: Herstory 1 2012

Originally Posted on March 1, 2012 by freemenow
BettyJean Downing

In honor of Women’s History Month March, 2012 we will be bringing you a herstory every day. Your contributions to our herstory series will be greatly appreciated.

Emily Warren Roebling (September 23, 1843 – February 28, 1903) was married to Washington Roebling, a civil engineer who was Chief Engineer during the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge. She is best known for her contribution to the completion of the Brooklyn Bridge after her husband developed caisson disease.

Emily was born to Sylvanus and Phebe Warren at Cold Spring, New York on September 23, 1843. She was the second youngest of twelve children.  Emily’s interest in pursuing education was supported by her older brother Gouverneur K. Warren.

In 1864, during the American Civil War, Emily visited her brother, then commanding the Fifth Army Corps, at his headquarters. During the visit, she became acquainted with Washington Roebling, the son of Brooklyn Bridge designer John A. Roebling, who was a civil engineer serving on Gouverneur Warren’s staff. Emily and Washington immediately fell in love and on January 18, 1865, the two were married.

The Brooklyn Bridge

On their return from their European studies, Emily and Washington were greeted with a turn of fate. Washington’s father died of tetanus, and Washington immediately took charge of the Brooklyn Bridge’s construction. As he immersed himself into the project, Washington developed caisson disease.  The disease affected Washington so badly that he became bed ridden. It was at that point where Emily stepped in as the “first woman field engineer” and saw out the completion of the Brooklyn Bridge.

As the only person to visit her husband during his sickness, Emily was to relay information from Washington to his assistants and report the progress of work on the bridge. She developed an extensive knowledge of strength of materials, stress analysis, cable construction, and calculating catenary curves through Washington’s teachings. For the next fourteen years, Emily’s dedication in aiding her husband in the completion of the Brooklyn Bridge was unyielding. She dealt with politicians, competing engineers, and all those associated with the work on the bridge to the point where people believed she was behind the bridge’s design.

In 1882, her husband’s position as chief engineer was in jeopardy due to his sickness. In order to allow Washington to complete the work, Emily went to gatherings of engineers and politicians to defend her husband. To the Roeblings’ relief, the politicians responded well to Emily’s speeches and Washington was permitted to remain Chief Engineer of the Brooklyn Bridge.

With Washington still on as Chief Engineer, the Brooklyn Bridge was finally completed in 1883. In advance of the official opening carrying a rooster as a sign of victory Emily Roebling was the first to cross the bridge by carriage.  At the opening ceremony, Emily was honored in a speech by Abram Stevens Hewitt who said at the bridge was …an everlasting monument to the sacrificing devotion of a woman and of her capacity for that higher education from which she has been too long disbarred.

Today the Brooklyn Bridge holds a plaque dedicating the memory of Emily, her husband, and her father-in-law.

 After the Bridge

After the completion of the Brooklyn Bridge, the Roebling family moved to Trenton, New Jersey. There, Emily participated in social organizations such as the Relief Society during the Spanish-American War and served on the Board of Lady Managers for New Jersey at the World’s Columbian Exposition.  She also continued her education and received a law degree from New York University. Until Emily’s death on February 28, 1903, she spent her remaining time with her family and kept socially and mentally active.

Al-Awlaki Joins Bin Ladin in the Company of Virgins

The Virgin Mary was on hand to sequester her Ladies in Waiting from the leers of the pedophile / prostitute patron Imam of San Diego and “Face Book Friend from Hell” (thank you, Fox & Friends) who greeted a drone missile with the famous inquiry: “Who the hell are you?”

I have always admired the Women of Wealthy Clans and Families who make a home for all family members, regardless of status and are gracious in their preservation of civilization among the would-be savages who enter their presence and are melted by Grace.

Men of the Middle East who impose terror on their countries by threatening women and veil their lust with a pretense of modesty-driven dress codes have seen a symbolic change. Saudi Arabia will honor those who are the chauffers, errand-runners, PTA and Community activists with DRIVERS’ LICENSES AND THE FREEDOM to actually get behind the wheel of their cars and get themselves where they’re going. Near the Saudi Border, just 40 miles away, a US Drone nailed the New Mexico born, American educated dual-citizen Internet pastor of hopeless young men who were callously exploited in their need for guidance. In Oman, to the East of Yemen, a Prince of the realm funded the release of, first the young American female and then her hiking companions. Are the Gentlemen of the Arab World coming to understand the tempering effect of FEMALES on the uncontrollable males they have Obaticized? While Reed and Pelosi are hanging out the sunroof of Obama’s Joyride in the Ship Of State, decent folk, not “invited” to the Party, are observing with awareness.

It’s just a matter of time before officers of the Peace have seen enough and have accrued enough “evidence and shown cause” to step in and restore order. In the misery of the last eleven years, we have suffered incompetence in the Oval Office first “brained” by Woman-Hating Karl Rove, then by the “dual-citizen of the World,” Obama who HIMSELF “vacationed” in Pakistan during his radicalizing years. The males of the Axlerod/Gibbs DNC are now marginalized by the true men of the Administration, Leon Panetta and David Patraeus. Having swapped roles and exchanged “Intelligence” in the process, they bring Hillary’s stand-in a slam-dunk he can remotely witness. Without any threat to a single golden kink of his hair, The Occupant of the Oval Office has permitted CLINTON’S PEOPLE to prove that the machinery of government of a Free People cannot be stymied by pretentious publicity-seekers and manipulators. Just as the Clinton People learned to respect Hillary for her fidelity to the man she loved in a pressure cooker, they learned to filter out the personally ambitious through her doomed campaign. And Hillary, the World’s #1 Diplomat, has personally traveled to, shaken hands with and faced world leaders in the most threatening financial circumstances, and brought peace of mind, that the Clintons, while getting little credit for their service, are Lamp Bearers, taking the Shining City on the Hill to the World. Where the Saudi’s once saw us as their Cash Cow, they now see us as their Dairy, where the milk of human kindness is gleaned from the peace-abiding, the long-suffering, preservationists. In the face of CHANGE they are reassured that some things remain, as you have come to rely upon, RELIABLE. That be Hillary. To the Yemeni Al Qaida, we extend “sincere” condolences for your “loss,” and to the Obatterie, we say: “Heads UP!” You can “claim” yet another Victory brought about by the Clinton Peeps. And while you need a billion dollars to mount a re-election campaign, all HRC needs is her friends.

Sexism and Misogyny Begins and Ends with Women

BettyJean Downing

The key to ending sexism/misogyny is stopping women from being sexists and misogynists and ends when women stop tolerating it at all levels.

When women unite, this world will be a better place but again that key is women! As long as the authorities can, keep women and children in a position of powerlessness, fear, and servitude by keeping them fighting each other – they win.

We are still the majority! Rise MAJORITY rise!

“So my real Labor Day wish is that we women stop finding things to divide us, stop letting others divide us using artificial devices to pit us against each other, and use our strength in numbers to come together and find solutions. Once we have found some answers, we need to act TOGETHER to get things done and not count on other people to do it for us. We have all of the brainpower, creativity, and common goals we need. We are lucky enough to live in a country that affords us the freedom to act. We just need to find the will to break away from old ways of thinking and make our world what we want it to be. ” Cynthia Ruccia  9/5/11

There is an insidious liberal movement to turn women into the minority right here in the USA as it is in the rest of the world. Our courts are male dominated and favored toward the males, DV is up, and women are murdered nearly five a day. Children are taken from their mothers and given to their abusive and sexually abusive fathers. Mothers are tossed into the streets and forced to pay alimony and child support without means to do so – thrown in jail then sexually abused by officers. Children are trafficked by their own fathers or photographed and pics sold as Kidde porn. Male dominated countries are buying trafficked female teen salves for sex:

The world is becoming unbalanced. In pockets across the globe, women are giving birth to too many boys. In China, the sex ratio is 121 boys to 100 girls. In India, it’s 112-to-100. Sex selection also is a force in the Balkans, Armenia and Georgia. In her eye-opening book, “Unnatural Selection: Choosing Boys Over Girls, and the Consequences of a World Full of Men,” journalist Mara Hvistendahl estimates that ultrasound and abortion have “claimed over 160 million potential women and girls — in Asia alone.” That is more than the entire female population of the United States.

Just look at the 2011 demographics and you can see the shift in the numbers in the younger generation as a result of killing the female unborn in countries where women are devalued. American women have targeted for years, women are liberated free to abort their children,  (52% female) free to be sexualized and objectified, but clearly not elevated to serve in the highest levels of office.

According to Cynthia Ruccia at WW2 We have never had a female president. Her readers and ours are predominately Independents, some who fled the emocratic party after Hillary Clinton, America’s best hope for a female president, was deprived by the Democrat Party in favor of MAKING HISTORY BY INSTALLING a BLACK MAN INSTEAD. A women with her competence would have been even more historic it turns out!

  1. The United States ranks #70 in the world in female representation in government
  2. Women make 75 cents on the man’s dollar
  3. Only 2.7% of CEO’s of Fortune 1000 companies are women
  4. Only 20% of Board positions are held by women, a number that has declined from a high of 24%
  5. 38% of companies in the U.S. have NO women in senior management
  6. Only 6 state governors are women
  7. Women hold approximately 24% of state legislative positions

Meanwhile Conservative women have proven American women can both reproduce, thus maintaining the majority in the US and be professional
women outside the home. Clearly, it is the Conservative women now running for
the highest offices. Female Republican candidates’ biggest problem is liberal
women who cannot cope with women who CAN do it all and are not whining about it!

Good old boys club and media continues to violate women because they can–  and it affects all women. It affected Gerry and Hillary before it affected Sarah and Michelle. Wake up ladies. The key to ending sexism/misogyny is to stop tolerating it from each other as well as from media and the government.

If you could fit the entire population of the world into a village consisting of 100 people maintaining the proportions of all the people living on Earth today, that village would consist of only one clear majority and that would be of women. That majority is beginning to disapear. No matter what color, race, national origin, religion or corner of the villiage we inhabbit the one thing that is absolutely true is that as women we are still a majority voice and in the US we still have the right to speak up and fight for equal rights and demand representation.  Let’s do this before we no longer have that option.

2011 Demographics

  • 57 Asians
  • 21 Europeans
  • 14 Americans (North, Central and South)
  • 8 Africans
  • 52 Women
  • 48 Men
  • 30 Caucasian 70 Non Caucasian
  • 30 Christian 70 Non-Christian
  • 89 Heterosexuals 11 Non heterosexuals 

Age structure

  • 0-14 years: 26.3% (male  944,987,919/female 884,268,378)
  • 15-64 years: 65.9% (male   2,234,860,865/female 2,187,838,153)
  • 65 years and over: 7.9% (male  227,164,176/female 289,048,221) (2011 est.)

Median age

  • total: 28.4 years
  • male: 27.7 years
  • female: 29 years (2009 est.)

Population growth rate

  • 1.092% (2011 est.)

Birth rate

  • 19.15 births/1,000 population      (2011 est.)

Death rate
                8.12 deaths/1,000 population      (July 2011 est.)

Urbanization

  • urban population: 50.5% of total population (2010)
  • rate of urbanization: 1.85% annual rate of change (2010-15 est.)
  • ten largest urban agglomerations: Tokyo (Japan) – 36,669,000; Delhi (India) – 22,157,000;  Sao
  • Paulo (Brazil) – 20,262,000; Mumbai (India) – 20,041,000; Mexico City (Mexico) – 19,460,000;
  • New York-Newark (US) – 19,425,000; Shanghai (China) – 6,575,000; Kolkata (India) – 15,552,000;
  • Dhaka (Bangladesh) – 14,648,000; Karachi (Pakistan) – 13,125,000 (2009)

Sex ratio

  • at birth: 1.07 male(s)/female
  • under 15 years: 1.07  male(s)/female
  • 15-64 years: 1.02   male(s)/female
  • 65 years and over: 0.79   male(s)/female
  • total population: 1.01  male(s)/female (2011 est.)

To The Presidential Advisors: LEADERSHIP CRED

When the drones observe “the Boss” breezing through his employees’ work zone, what they actually witness is the Agent of the Support System into which their efforts and energies, accrued expertise and will are condensed. Enroute to the top job in the company, this Chief Executive would have surrounded himself with a solid structure of competent performers who think like him, in a “Company-First” synchrony.

Another “Barry” clueless out in Left Field with the jock attitude, awaits the verdict from a Jury deliberating the issue of his fidelity to the Truth. Son of Baseball Great Bobby Bonds, Godson of Willie Mayes, this Barry was incapable of understanding what it was the FANS expected from his greatness. While Bonds demanded attention and big money in a quid-pro-quo ploy to deliver to the Pirates only as much as he perceived Tribute had purchased, he routinely alienated ticket buyers, autograph seekers and event patrons with a “No Show” snottiness that didn’t play at all in Pittsburgh. Without Bobby Bonnilla next door in Center, Bonds could not have begun to deduce what his job was out there in the “Corner” of Three Rivers. Sure, he had the “trick” blythe catch of dropping fly balls into an upturned, confidant glove – and almost always caught the third out thusly with the showy clipped step to start running to the dugout ending the inning. But Bonds never really grasped the relationship between the “players” in the seats with the “Stars” on the Field. Although the Pirates got to the Playoffs of Major League Baseball three years in a row in the early Nineties, The 30-30 club “Individual” record setter never delivered when the Team was in position to advance to the World Series. Bonds’ failure to prevent Syd Bream’s “The Slide” scoring the Braves’ winning run is burned into the retina of all Pirate Fans who find his current “juicing” saga not surprising. For all his talent, Bonds never had the “Heart” of a leader and couldn’t equate his own self-interest with that of his Team or his Town.

Speak to the Democrats who lost in November about the President’s “leadership” and you might get a stunning review of the “Context” in which they played ball with Barry through the chain-gang subordination that appeared, from here, to be a Pelosi/Reed Puppet Show. The DCCC Tough Guy, Emmanuel, promptly became the CCCC Tough Guy – Chicago Congressional Campaign Committee – the moment “individual opportunity” opened a door for Barry’s Chief of Staff. “Barry” from the Block is “NOW PLAYING” in the block-head game that will finally shut down the Government. As the New England Patriots observed of the gunslinger, Ben Roethlesberger in failing to lead the Steelers to the AFC Championship in 2005, “He played like what he is: A ROOKIE.”

Metaphorically, we discern, Alas!, that the “One” is working on his individual stats – far more interested in the numbers he’ll take into the negotiations with the Electorate as he seeks re-election, and the Progressives-led D.N.C. is subordinating its job of taking a TEAM into office with OFA redux. To quote a famous candidate from 2008: “You can put lipstick on a Pig, but it’s still a PIG.”

While the clay-footed Collasus continues to drive the Chariot of the Sun across the sky, the “horses” who pull the cart belong to Hillary and Bill. In a System of Checks and Balances, there is no room at the Top. There is nothing more than squirms and pressure, and in such a tightly confined wedge, the synergy, not the elements, is what makes for security. It would appear that the Exxpress Elevator to the Oval Office is for Freight, not Executive Delivery. In an ironic twist on the whole “Brother” in Chief extravaganza, the truly productive Workers of the World recognize the value of the Team Player who, in truth, both leads and contributes. Barry from the Blockade wedged out the “Team” from the fleeting Laurel Crown, but the Leadership he substitutes for legitimate neither galvanizes nor unites the key players. He has no Game, no Plan, no GOTO and absolutely no credibility for the Big One. He’s been around sports enough to understand the “What have you done for me?” lately or otherwise fan attitude.